Abuse survivor Jordan Turpin reveals she had to beg for a job at Taco Bell after being left homeless

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‘House of Horrors’ abuse survivor Jordan Turpin has revealed she had to beg for a job at Taco Bell after being left ‘homeless’ and unable to afford food when she was kicked out of foster care.

Jordan, now 21, and her 12 siblings, spent 17 years being chained up, starved, and beaten by their parents, David and Louise Turpin.

When Jordan managed to escape in 2018 by bravely climbing through a window and calling for help at a payphone, the children were rescued from the torturous home. However, the horror didn’t end there. 

After the siblings – who ranged in age from two to 29 at the time – were rescued, many were put into foster care, where Jordan said the pain and suffering continued.

She claimed that herself, and five of her sisters and brothers, were abused by the family that was assigned to look after them, and when she was transferred to a new home, she was then kicked out and left with no where to live.

‘House of Horrors’ abuse survivor Jordan Turpin has revealed she had to beg for a job at Taco Bell after being left homeless and unable to afford food when she was kicked out of foster care 

Jordan (circled), now 21, and her 12 siblings, spent 17 years being chained up, starved, and beaten by their parents, David and Louise Turpin

Jordan (circled), now 21, and her 12 siblings, spent 17 years being chained up, starved, and beaten by their parents, David and Louise Turpin 

When Jordan (circled) managed to escape in 2018 by bravely climbing through a window and calling for help at a payphone, the children were rescued from the torturous home

When Jordan (circled) managed to escape in 2018 by bravely climbing through a window and calling for help at a payphone, the children were rescued from the torturous home

However, the horror didn't end there. After the siblings - who ranged in age from two to 29 at the time - were rescued, many were put into foster care, where they were abused more

However, the horror didn’t end there. After the siblings – who ranged in age from two to 29 at the time – were rescued, many were put into foster care, where they were abused more

Now, she has opened up about her torturous journey, and revealed how she has finally come to peace with it during a powerful interview with People magazine (pictured)

Now, she has opened up about her torturous journey, and revealed how she has finally come to peace with it during a powerful interview with People magazine (pictured)

She said she bounced between her siblings’ houses – but was often starving, since she didn’t have a permanent residence, anyone to look after her, or an income. 

Unable to afford food, Jordan recalled walking into a Taco Bell and begging them to give her work, during a powerful new interview with People magazine.

‘Me and my siblings always used to sing a Taco Bell theme song we made up [when we were trapped]. It’s just always been special to us,’ she explained. ‘I didn’t know what to say on the spot, but I just knew I deeply needed a job.’ 

Jordan (pictured recently) said that when she was transferred to a new foster home, she was then kicked out and left with no where to live

Jordan (pictured recently) said that when she was transferred to a new foster home, she was then kicked out and left with no where to live

The fast food joint hired her to work the night shift. However, since she had no car and was never taught how to use the bus, she was often forced to walk home late at night by herself.

‘There were times I had to walk an hour in the middle of the night to work so I could afford food, it was really scary,’ she told the outlet.

Jordan managed to flee from her parents home in Perris, California – where she, and her 12 siblings had lived for 17 years – before she phoned 911 and alerted the police of her parent’s abuse. 

Details later emerged about how the Turpins beat and starved their children, shackling them to beds and denying them basic hygiene like showers – which only occurred once a year. 

The kids were mainly kept in their rooms except for meals, which had been reduced from three times to once per day, a combination of lunch and dinner; for years, the siblings’ diet consisted of nothing but two slices of bread with peanut butter or bologna.

Jordan (pictured recently) said she bounced between her siblings houses - but was often starving, since she didn't have a permanent residence, anyone to look after her, or an income

Jordan (pictured recently) said she bounced between her siblings houses – but was often starving, since she didn’t have a permanent residence, anyone to look after her, or an income

The fast food joint hired her to work the night shift. However, since she had no car and was never taught how to use the bus, she was often forced to walk home late at night by herself

The fast food joint hired her to work the night shift. However, since she had no car and was never taught how to use the bus, she was often forced to walk home late at night by herself

Unable to afford food, Jordan recalled walking into a Taco Bell and begging them to give her work. She is seen earlier this year

The fast food joint hired Jordan (seen with her siblings and parents) to work the night shift. However, since she had no car, she was often forced to walk home late at night by herself

The fast food joint hired Jordan (seen with her siblings and parents) to work the night shift. However, since she had no car, she was often forced to walk home late at night by herself 

The couple was also accused of taunting their children with food that they were forbidden to eat. The Turpin parents would chow down on fast food in front of them, and chained the children to filthy beds if they tried to steal food.

Jordan recalled finding joy in learning, and taught herself basic math, reading, and writing while being held captive by her parents.

After she was rescued at age 17, a placement test determined that was on a third-grade level. She soon began homeschooling – and worked hard and improved quickly.

Within a year, she was on a high school junior level, and at age 18, she started public school for the first time. She kept her past a secret from her classmates so she could enjoy a normal education, and used a fake last name to conceal her identity. 

‘It was so cool because I’ve never been around people my age other than my siblings,’ she said to People.

‘I made friends within two weeks. Every time someone would ask me questions [about my past], they’d say, “She’s too shy. She won’t answer.” I loved it.’

Jordan said she hasn’t spoken to her parents in years, explaining that she ‘wouldn’t have been able to heal’ had she kept in touch with them. 

‘I still have nightmares. I can’t imagine if I ever kept in contact with them’ she added. ‘There’s no way I would be able to heal.’

After the kids were rescued, details later emerged about how the Turpins (pictured) beat and starved their 12 children, shackling them to beds and denying them basic hygiene like showers

After the kids were rescued, details later emerged about how the Turpins (pictured) beat and starved their 12 children, shackling them to beds and denying them basic hygiene like showers

Jordan said she still has nightmares and that she spent years suffering from depression after becoming 'really broken.' She is seen (right) with her sister Jennifer (left) and other siblings

Jordan said she still has nightmares and that she spent years suffering from depression after becoming ‘really broken.’ She is seen (right) with her sister Jennifer (left) and other siblings

Last year, Jordan, alongside her sister Jennifer (pictured), spoke out publicly for the first time about their suffering during a powerful interview with Diane Sawyer for ABC News

Last year, Jordan, alongside her sister Jennifer (pictured), spoke out publicly for the first time about their suffering during a powerful interview with Diane Sawyer for ABC News 

When the children were rescued, all but the two-year-old were severely underweight. The parents’ abuse and neglect was so ‘severe, pervasive, [and] prolonged’ that it stunted their children’s growth, led to muscle wasting, and left two of their daughters unable to bear children. 

The Turpin parents pleaded guilty to several felonies in 2019, and were each sentenced to life sentences with the possibility of parole after serving 25 years. 

Then, in March 2021, the foster parents who had been looking after six of the Turpin kids, including Jordan – Marcelino and Rosa Olguin- were arrested and charged with multiple counts of child abuse. 

Marcelino, 63, was charged with the sexual abuse of two of them and of physically and mentally torturing all five. His wife Rosa, 58, and their daughter Lennys, 37, were hit with torture and false imprisonment charges for their alleged part in the abuse. They pleaded not guilty. 

The six of them also filed a lawsuit against Riverside County and a private foster care agency called ChildNet Youth and Family Services, claiming that they had been abused by their foster parents and that the organization knew the couple had a past record of abuse and failed to help them when they spoke up.

One month before the Olguins got arrested, Jordan was placed with different foster parents – who then kicked her out, leaving her with no where to go, effectively rendering her ‘homeless.’ 

She eventually entered into college, but was plagued with memories from her past – and she began to suffer from severe depression.

While she admitted that it was hard for her, she said she quickly saw a change after sharing her story with the world. She is seen on the show

While she admitted that it was hard for her, she said she quickly saw a change after sharing her story with the world. She is seen on the show

Jordan is now thriving, and has become a budding TikTok star - racking up more than 746,000 followers for her fun dance videos

Jordan is now thriving, and has become a budding TikTok star - racking up more than 746,000 followers for her fun dance videos

Jordan is now thriving, and has become a budding TikTok star – racking up more than 746,000 followers for her fun dance videos

She said she is still 'very, very' close to her siblings, and makes sure to see them often. She is seen with her sister Jennifer earlier this year

She said she is still ‘very, very’ close to her siblings, and makes sure to see them often. She is seen with her sister Jennifer earlier this year

‘It was impossible to sleep. Every time my eyes would close, I dreamed about being [in my first foster home],’ she admitted. ‘I had to go to the emergency room a lot. I was really, really broken.’

Last year, Jordan, alongside her sister Jennifer Turpin spoke out publicly for the first time about their suffering during a powerful interview with Diane Sawyer for ABC News. 

And while she admitted that it was hard for her, she said she quickly saw a change after speaking out.

‘I wasn’t doing well, but I felt we weren’t the only ones being treated wrong in the system – and I wanted to help my siblings,’ she explained. 

‘[Afterwards], the people that really know they messed up were just gone. Some quit and said: “I don’t work here anymore.”‘

She recently purchased her first apartment, which she admitted was 'scary' for her. But now, she said she feels like 'her life is about to actually start'

She recently purchased her first apartment, which she admitted was ‘scary’ for her. But now, she said she feels like ‘her life is about to actually start’ 

Jordan is now thriving, and has become a budding TikTok star – racking up more than 746,000 followers for her fun dance videos, as well as clips that show her trying out makeup and modeling different outfits.  

She recently purchased her first apartment in Southern California, which she admitted was ‘scary’ for her. But now, she feels like ‘her life is about to actually start.’

‘At first it was scary. It’s expensive, and you’re not aware of how much you’re gonna need. But I love design and decorating, and I’m a very organized person,’ she gushed.

‘Sometimes I walk into my apartment and literally think, “Is this real?” I’m more independent and can just be myself. This is everything I ever wanted. I’ve been feeling like my life is about to actually start.’

She said she is still ‘very, very’ close to her siblings, and makes sure to see them often.

She revealed: ‘We have inside jokes and have so much fun together. After everything that happened, and after escaping, I’m so protective over each one. They always know they have me.’

She has plans to write a memoir one day, and wants to become a motivational speaker – in the hopes of helping other victims feel less alone.

‘I want to take what I went through and turn it into something positive,’ she concluded. ‘I want people to know they’re not alone. There is a way out.

‘The best thing that can happen to me is seeing that I made someone’s day. Sometimes I get comments [on TikTok] like, “I can relate to this,” and that makes me so excited.

‘I’m very thankful and blessed that I can be there to help others and make a difference.’

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